Grumpy Old Sod Dot Com - an internet voice for the exasperated. Sick of the nanny state? Pissed off with politicians? Annoyed by newspapers? Irate with the internet? Tell us about it!

Send us an email
Go back
11th September 2013: The world's gone mad and I'm the only one who knows
30th August 2013: Isn't sarcasm a wonderful thing?
25th August 2013: Operation Yewtree has turned British justice on its head
13th August 2013: Black is white. Fact. End of.
11th August 2013: Why 'human rights' is nothing of the sort ...
11th August 2013: Electric cars, not as green as they're painted?
6th August 2013: How the British nation treats its friends ...
8th July 2013: The BBC biased? How can that be? They're so NICE!
26th June 2013: Think this country is a bastion of freedom and justice and a shining model for the world? Think again.
18th June 2013: Wrinklies unite, you have nothing to lose but your walking frames!
17th June 2013: is the end finally approaching for this evil woman?
31st May 2013: Now it's official - the BBC really is a left-wing propaganda machine
31st May 2013: Those evil bastards are at it again. Yes, you've guessed it - social services!
27th May 2013: Well-known TV presenter talks sense. No good will come of it.
24th May 2013: British justice is best? Only for the very poor, apparently ...
17th May 2013: Some actual FACTS about climate change (for a change) from actual scientists ...
10th May 2013: An article about that poison gas, carbon dioxide, and other scientific facts (not) ...
10th May 2013: We need to see past the sex and look at the crimes: is justice being served?
8th May 2013: So, who would you trust to treat your haemorrhoids, Theresa May?
8th May 2013: Why should citizens in the 21st Century fear the law so much?
30th April 2013: What the GOS says today, the rest of the world realises tomorrow ...
30th April 2013: You couldn't make it up, could you? Luckily you don't need to ...
29th April 2013: a vote for NONE OF THE ABOVE, because THE ABOVE are crap ...
28th April 2013: what goes around, comes around?
19th April 2013: everyone's a victim these days ...
10th April 2013: Thatcher is dead; long live Thatcher!
8th April 2013: Poor people are such a nuisance. Just give them loads of money and they'll go away ...
26th March 2013: Censorship is alive and well and coming for you ...
25th March 2013: Just do your job properly, is that too much to ask?
25th March 2013: So, what do you think caused your heterosexuality?
20th March 2013: Feminists - puritans, hypocrites or just plain stupid?
18th March 2013: How Nazi Germany paved the way for modern governance?
13th March 2013: Time we all grew up and lived in the real world ...
12th March 2013: Hindenburg crash mystery solved? - don't you believe it!
6th March 2013: Is this the real GOS?
5th March 2013: All that's wrong with taxes
25th February 2013: The self-seeking MP who is trying to bring Britain down ...
24th February 2013: Why can't newspapers just tell the truth?
22nd February 2013: Trial by jury - a radical proposal
13th February 2013: A little verse for two very old people ...
6th February 2013: It's not us after all, it's worms
6th February 2013: Now here's a powerful argument FOR gay marriage ...
4th February 2013: There's no such thing as equality because we're not all the same ...
28th January 2013: Global Warming isn't over - IT'S HIDING!
25th January 2013: Global Warmers: mad, bad and dangerous to know ...
25th January 2013: Bullying ego-trippers, not animal lovers ...
19th January 2013: We STILL haven't got our heads straight about gays ...
16th January 2013: Bullying ego-trippers, not animal lovers ...
11th January 2013: What it's like being English ...
7th January 2013: Bleat, bleat, if it saves the life of just one child ...
7th January 2013: How best to put it? 'Up yours, Argentina'?
7th January 2013: Chucking even more of other people's money around ...
6th January 2013: Chucking other people's money around ...
30th December 2012: The BBC is just crap, basically ...
30th December 2012: We mourn the passing of a genuine Grumpy Old Sod ...
30th December 2012: How an official body sets out to ruin Christmas ...
16th December 2012: Why should we pardon Alan Turing when he did nothing wrong?
15th December 2012: When will social workers face up to their REAL responsibility?
15th December 2012: Unfair trading by a firm in Bognor Regis ...
14th December 2012: Now the company that sells your data is pretending to act as watchdog ...
7th December 2012: There's a war between cars and bikes, apparently, and  most of us never noticed!
26th November 2012: The bottom line - social workers are just plain stupid ...
20th November 2012: So, David Eyke was right all along, then?
15th November 2012: MPs don't mind dishing it out, but when it's them in the firing line ...
14th November 2012: The BBC has a policy, it seems, about which truths it wants to tell ...
12th November 2012: Big Brother, coming to a school near you ...
9th November 2012: Yet another celebrity who thinks, like Jimmy Saville, that he can behave just as he likes because he's famous ...
5th November 2012: Whose roads are they, anyway? After all, we paid for them ...
7th May 2012: How politicians could end droughts at a stroke if they chose ...
6th May 2012: The BBC, still determined to keep us in a fog of ignorance ...
2nd May 2012: A sense of proportion lacking?
24th April 2012: Told you so, told you so, told you so ...
15th April 2012: Aah, sweet ickle polar bears in danger, aah ...
15th April 2012: An open letter to Anglian Water ...
30th March 2012: Now they want to cure us if we don't believe their lies ...
28th February 2012: Just how useful is a degree? Not very.
27th February 2012: ... so many ways to die ...
15th February 2012: DO go to Jamaica because you definitely WON'T get murdered with a machete. Ms Fox says so ...
31st January 2012: We don't make anything any more
27th January 2012: There's always a word for it, they say, and if there isn't we'll invent one
26th January 2012: Literary criticism on GOS? How posh!
12th December 2011: Plain speaking by a scientist about the global warming fraud
9th December 2011: Who trusts scientists? Apart from the BBC, of course?
7th December 2011: All in all, not a good week for British justice ...
9th November 2011: Well what d'you know, the law really IS a bit of an ass ...

 

 
Captain Grumpy's bedtime reading. You can buy them too, if you think you're grumpy enough!
Readers wives. Yes, really!
More Grumpy Old Sods on the net

 

 
Older stuff
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
This article by Lewis Page first appeared on The Register ...
 

 
How politicians could end droughts FOREVER
(But they don't want to; they'd rather ration your water than do some simple sums)

Last month in old London town and across England, formal water rationing came into force again for the second time in just six years - and the creeping rationing of water meters continued to spread. Despite the rainiest April since records began, government minsters are openly speculating that total mains cutoffs and standpipes in the street may be required next year.
 
And yet, astonishingly, it would require only a small investment - far less than has been spent on fixing leaky pipes in recent years - to render the capital's water supplies completely and utterly drought-proof, forever. All the fresh, drinkable water the city's population requires for its taps, its showers and its hosepipes could be produced without taking a drop from rivers, aquifers or reservoirs, at minimal cost and with only a tiny impact on energy use and carbon emissions.
 
In short, Britons' water is being needlessly rationed in a staggeringly pointless effort to limit energy consumption and carbon emissions by a very small amount - a move driven, as is so very normal, by a political (and civil service) agenda which seems completely divorced from the hard numbers surrounding the issue.
 
Londoners vote tomorrow in the capital's mayoral elections, but both candidates, it seems, would rather prepare people for more stringent rationing (to the point of poor hygiene and serious health risks) than make any attempt to sort matters out once and for all.
 
Here are the hard numbers in a nutshell, using London as a case study for the whole of the UK - and indeed the entire developed world.
 
Average normal water consumption by the capital's 8 million people is 167 litres per person per day: just to be clear, this includes the use of hosepipes for watering gardens, washing vehicles etc. Almost all of this water at the moment is taken from rivers or extracted from groundwater. These supplies are finite and depend ultimately on rainfall. As the city's population has grown, it has gradually become the case that they may not cope with demand during prolonged dry spells.
 
But modern technology can be used to cheaply turn seawater, the supply of which is effectively infinite, into fresh drinking water by desalinating it. Alone among British water companies London's Thames Water does actually possess a single desalination plant, at Beckton on the Thames Estuary, but this only has the capacity to produce 150 million litres a day - less than 10 per cent of the city's requirements - and it is run at low output or completely shut down most of the time.
 
In general, desalinating seawater in a modern reverse-osmosis plant like Beckton requires the use of 7 kilowatt-hours (kWh or "units" on your electricity bill) of electrical energy to produce a tonne (1,000 litres) of drinking water. In fact, Beckton requires significantly less energy than this as estuarine water is not as salty as seawater proper, but this article is meant for a wider audience than just Londoners, so let's assume 7 kWh/tonne to begin with.
 
In order to make all the water a person requires, then, a desalination plant needs approximately 1 kWh per day. A kilowatt-hour, purchased on the wholesale electricity markets, can generally be obtained for six pence or less at the moment: the necessary energy would cost a water company say 22 per person annually.
 
Total electricity cost for a whole year's water supply from the sea, London wide? About 176m, less than Thames Water's profit margin even in hard times; much less when the company is doing well. And of course in reality there would be no need to use desalination for the entire supply (this would actually cause flooding). Also, in reality, we are speaking of brackish water not brine. So we can see that using desalination to make London drought-proof would cost very little.
 
But what about capital investment? Maybe desalination plants are really expensive. Maybe that's why we only have one proper one in the whole of the UK, and why we are so often told there's a drought on and we must expect hardships.
 
Nope: Beckton cost just 270m to build. Another 15 such plants - enough to provide London's entire water supply if required - would cost approximately 4bn, an investment of just 500 for each person living in the city. Enough desalination plants to provide half the supply, which would make the city completely drought-proof for the foreseeable future, could have been built for less money than Thames Water has spent reducing leaks in the last nine years - and the leaks programme, while highly disruptive to the city as roads have been torn up in order to replace old pipes, has delivered only comparatively minor water savings.
 
So that's the reality of water supply and modern technology. For a trivial cost, we can make all the fresh water we need out of seawater.
 
So it's really very plain that there's no possible excuse for ever imposing standpipes or hosepipe bans or any other form of water rationing on Londoners or indeed anyone else - certainly anybody who lives in a developed nation within reach of the sea (the great majority of the human race lives near the sea or tidal estuaries connected to it). Modern reverse-osmosis technology means that we can use small amounts of energy to make as much fresh drinking water as we want, and the costs are small enough that the resulting water is too cheap to meter. Running an oven for an hour or two, remember, consumes enough energy to make an entire tonne of water.
 
And yet here we are in the year 2012, in one of the planet's greatest and richest cities, with water rationing in force and worse rationing being foretold. What on Earth is going on?
 
Briefly, politics is going on. The former London mayor, Ken Livingstone, virulently opposed the building of the Beckton desalination plant. His successor, the extrovert bicycling media-tart Boris Johnson, allowed Beckton to go ahead. Yet it is still official London government policy under his administration that "desalination is considered an emergency measure and is not a long-term solution for future supply needs".
 
This picture is echoed nationally, with the head of water at the Environment Agency telling the BBC that "you don't want to rely on desalination".
 
Why?
 
Because, we are told, desalination is "carbon intensive". That is, the energy used in a reverse-osmosis plant involves serious CO2 emissions.
 
Is that right? On the face of it we're talking about a lot of energy here, no less than 2,920 gigawatt-hours per year in the every-drop-from-seawater case for the whole of London's supplies. That equates to a hefty-sounding 1.25 million tonnes of CO2 emissions each year.
 
Maybe we should, in fact, stop watering our gardens, stop washing our cars - even stop washing our clothes and ourselves, as some scientists advocate. But in fact this is a foolish argument to make. That one kilowatt-hour per day for each of us to make 167 litres of water from sea brine is actually trivial.
 
Each Londoner already uses 52kWh every day on all his or her other, hugely more significant, energy expenditures - transport, heating, cooling, lighting and the rest. Normal non-London Brits, who live in different kinds of buildings, who drive more and use public transport less, get through an even heftier 70 kWh or more daily.
 
The fact is - and this applies everywhere, not just the capital - if you ever drive your car, washing it using a hosepipe fed from a desalination plant adds almost nothing to the energy you use. If you heat water up at all (that is if you use it for cooking or washing, which accounts for the vast majority of domestic water use) the fact that it is desalinated seawater means almost nothing in energy terms. And if you use a hosepipe to water green growing plants in urban terrain, the fact that you are helping take carbon from the air and reduce the urban "heat island" effect in hot summers certainly outweighs the small amount of energy required to make that hose water from pure brine.
 
In the reality right now, where most London water would still necessarily come from rivers and boreholes in order to prevent floods and we'd be desalinating not sea brine but merely-brackish Thames estuary water, the effect on energy use and carbon emissions would be completely imperceptible: an increase of a very small fraction of a single percentage point.
 
Even the most hardline extremist greens, who take it as a solid fact that carbon emissions are a deadly threat and must be reduced at any cost, would - if they were thinking sensibly - surely hesitate to expend any serious amount of their sharply limited supply of political capital, of hard-won public goodwill, on achieving such a tiny carbon reduction. This is all the more so as hosepipe bans during rainless summers actually make cities less green. A green campaigner wanting to reduce energy use and carbon emissions would achieve more by doing almost anything else: persuading people to use public transport, insulating buildings better, battling against patio heaters, encouraging less washing etc etc.
 
But the Greens don't have to expend any political capital on this, as mainstream politicians have decided that desalination is bad already. There can't be anything much crazier than presenting desalination as a significant environmental problem and using political power to suppress it - and then using political power again to ration people's water to deal with the artificial "drought" that political idiocy has caused. But that's what London - and national - politicians are doing.
 
But come on - surely it can't be the Greens and the mainstream politicians' fault, not when there's a multibillion-pound monopoly supplier like Thames Water in the picture? Certainly the company's customers, watching their bills surge upward as their gardens, parks and cars turn brown and dusty this summer, will not be pleased to hear that Beckton is shut down right now and that it ran at a measly 10 to 40 per cent of full output in March; though a company spokesman assures The Register that it will be "running throughout the summer" and that there "may be days" where it is run at full power, depending on demand and rainfall in the months ahead.
 
That's not very impressive, though, when Thames Water has had the cheek to impose a ban on hosepipes using delegated governmental powers which it can employ at its own discretion. Running Beckton at full power wouldn't cost Thames Water much, as we've seen - but simply ordering a hosepipe ban costs the company nothing at all.
 
But to be honest, given the imbecilic political climate it was operating in, Thames Water probably deserves quite a lot of credit for getting Beckton built at all. Left to itself there can't be much doubt that the company would have built more Becktons as this would have achieved a lot more at less cost than digging up pipes and replacing them - though of course Thames Water is reluctant to say so for fear of drawing more flak from numerically illiterate Greens and journalists.
 
Instead the company has felt compelled to spend billions on reducing leakage in its pipe network by a relatively paltry amount - money which could have built more desalination plants and made London's water supplies drought-proof by now. There's no doubt that a lot of the city's aged Victorian pipes needed (and that many still need) replacing, but this was plainly not the most cost-effective way to spend the money with a serious supply shortage going on.
 

 
The GOS says: Shame the article bangs on about London all the time, but nevertheless the gist of it is staggering and very convincing.
 
Mankind is going to have to get to grips with desalination sooner or later, because as the world becomes more populous a lot of us are going to end up living on the oceans. This is my latest theory great floating cities, so large as to be immune to storms, will house hundreds of thousands of people and all the services and factories they need. We probably have all the technology at our fingertips already. They will farm the sea, growing seaweed, fish and shellfish under the city.
 
They will be untroubled by drought, flood, earthquakes or overcrowding if you need more living space, just add an extra pontoon. Even the dread tsunami will hold no fear for a floating city, because tsunamis do no damage until the ocean floor rises to the shore, tripping the bottom of the wave causing it to rear up and break. Ships at sea ride over tsunamis sometimes without even noticing.
 
All in all, a pretty good scheme, I think. Our only enemy will be rust!

 

 
Grumpy Old Sod.com - homepage
 

 
Use this Yahoo Search box to find more grumpy places,
either on this site or on the World Wide Web.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Copyright © 2012 The GOS
 
Grumpy Old Sod.com - homepage

 

Captain Grumpy's
Favourites
- some older posts

 
Campaign
 
Proposal
 
Burglars
 
Defence
 
ID cards
 
Old folk
 
Hairy man
 
Democracy
 
Mud
 
The NHS
 
Violence
 
Effluent
 
Respect
 
Litter
 
Weapons
 
The church
 
Blame
 
Parenting
 
Paedophiles
 
The Pope
 
Punishing
 
Racism
 
Scientists
 
Smoking
 
Stupidity
 
Swimming
 
Envirocrap
 
Spying